Archive for the ‘cnbc’ Category


this is the CNBC video of Erin Burnett’s spat with Michael Pento of Euro Pacific Capital on the merits of US Treasuries.

Looks like someone doesn’t like it when you poke a hole in their fantasy world…

The best part of the video, however, is not that.

It is when the other guest, Joseph Balestrino of Federated Investors, says:

Nothing is in a bubble when people want to buy it..”!!!  

Go tell that to the guys that were buying the NASDAQ/loading up on tech stocks  in January 2000 or (and, as they were probably the same old fools) buying/flipping homes in California, Florida, etc during 2007!!

Airtime: Tues. Sept. 7 2010 | :40:0 10 ET

http://plus.cnbc.com/rssvideosearch/action/player/id/1585891838/code/cnbcplayershare

Is U.S. Debt Junk? – CNBC.com

Share this|var addthis_config = { ui_cobrand: “The MasterBlog”}

________________________
The MasterBlog


Second Leg of Crisis Beginning: Hedge Fund Manager

Published: Tuesday, 31 Aug 2010 | 5:38 AM ET
By: Patrick Allen
CNBC Senior News Editor
September and October hold bad news for stock markets and banks remain overleveraged as we head into the second leg of the financial crisis according to Pedro De Noronha, the managing partner at Noster Capital in London.

“We are seeing one of the most challenging years for investors ever,” De Noronha told CNBC Tuesday. “Major investors are simply leaving the market. When it looks like markets are about to fall off the cliff they rally and vice versa.

“There are problems coming from the resetting of US mortgages and (the) euro area remains a big worry,” he said.
“Germany is unwilling to save any other European country,” De Noronha said. “Merkel used up lots of political capital saving Greece and she saved the Greek bond market in order to save the French and German banking system from more big losses.”
“There are four or five countries that have major structural problems that should not be in the euro,” he said. “I still have (yet) to see a politician who will shoot themselves in the head on austerity.”
“The Greeks have no choice but to cut, the others like Spain are not doing enough, I am with the ‘Austerian’ school and do not buy the Keynesian argument,” he said.
On Monday, Nobel-prize-winning economist Paul Krugman called for another big stimulus program for the US, saying “(e)verything is pointing to the need for more spending.”
Laughable Tests?
De Noronha said he is also very worried about the banking industry and is shorting five of the biggest bank stocks in Europe: UBS, Barclays cnbc_comboQuoteMove(‘popup_barc-ln_ID0EGGAC15839609’);[BARC-LN 308.30 5.90 (+1.95%) ] cnbc_quoteComponent_init_getData(“barc-ln”,”WSODQ_COMPONENT_BARC-LN_ID0EGGAC15839609″,”WSODQ”,”true”,”ID0EGGAC15839609″,”off”,”false”,”inLineQuote”); , Intesa Sanpaolo, Unione de Banche and BBVA.
“The recent stress tests made me laugh,” he said. “We only stress tested what the banks told us, I did not see anyone testing anyone until they had gone broke.”
“When I look at Tier 1 Capital ratios, I find things propping them up that are not assets that can be drawn on in a crisis,” he said. “The real capital 1 ratio of some major banks is just 1.7 percent and I am shorting five major European banks as a result.”
The majority of banks remain over leveraged going into what could be the second leg of the financial crisis, De Noronha added.

“The regulators used 6 percent as the threshold for defining the minimum capital ratios, but that 6 percent number includes non-cash assets such as deferred tax assets and goodwill,” he said. “If you use only tangible book equity the 6 percent of the biggest offenders turns into closer to 2 percent which implies a leverage ratio of 50 times. That is hardly conservative for current the current economic reality.”

On Tuesday, Credit Suisse took a different stance, boosting its rating on banking to “overweight” from “market weight,” saying that economic risks are “overplayed” and that “funding should be less costly than initially feared.”
© 2010 CNBC.com

Global Economy – Second Leg of Crisis Beginning: Hedge Fund Manager – CNBC

Share this|var addthis_config = { ui_cobrand: “The MasterBlog”}

________________________
The MasterBlog


Blackstone’s Byron Wien Singlehandedly Refutes The Double Dip, Hilarity Abounds
To all the bulls out there, we have a Wien-er just for you. In an essay that is basically a sequel to last week’s job application in a second-tier position in the administration by a Moody’s strategist and a Princeton economist (yes, yes, we know… oxymorons), the BlackStone head of something, Byron Wien, says the fututre for the market, the economy, and pretty much everything else is brighter than a nuclear bomb (incidentally one going off today would likely send the market into the greatest melt up in history). 


Lest there be any confuction what Byron’s view is: “My view is that the economy is going through a temporary lull and business conditions will improve later this year and in 2011.” At least Wien is honest: “In preparing this essay I used research from Goldman Sachs, Lord Abbett, Credit Suisse and International Strategy and Investments for arguments on both sides of the double-dip issue.” Mmhmm – that some serious “both sides” source list. And the piece de resistance: “The factors that argue against a resumption of the recession are the strong liquidity position of corporations which have 6% of their assets in cash, a level not seen since the 1960s, and the fact that both housing and autos are at low levels of production and not likely to drop further.” 


Over the weekend we will present an extended analysis finally putting to rest the inane argument that corporations are flush with cash: while true on a gross basis, the net level of cash vs debt, and especially vs equity, is at one of the worst levels in history. This ongoing childish avoidances of the liability side of the corporate balance sheet must stop and someone has to finally shut up these so called sophisticated economists and their endless lies.  


Feel free to print out two copies of the attached Wien essay: we hear his work “product” is much better in two ply format.
  h/t FMX Connect

View article…





%d bloggers like this: