Archive for the ‘Mining Stocks’ Category


>

Gold falls, silver drops 4 pct after bin Laden death

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Gold fell from a record high on Monday and silver notched its biggest one-day loss in seven weeks after the killing of Osama bin Laden sapped the safe-haven premium out of precious metals.


Silver bounced off early lows after falling as much as 11 percent, as speculators scaled back their bullish bets on increased futures margins and a technical overhang after a 170 percent rally over the last 12 months to a record high last week.
Gold initially rose to a record high for a fourth consecutive session, but news of the al Qaeda leader's killing by U.S. forces sent gold down almost 2 percent. The CBOE gold volatility index, a gauge of bullion investor anxiety, posted its biggest-ever two-session gain since its inception in September last year.
"People are pulling out of gold and going back into the equity market, as the news had a de-risking effect on the geopolitical environment," said Steven Faber, analyst at Haber Trilix Advisors, which manages $2 billion in assets.
Investor buying later lifted bullion off its lows after data showed U.S. manufacturing activity slowed in April for a second straight month but input prices reached their highest level in nearly three years.
Spot gold was down 0.4 percent at $1,558.09 an ounce by 2:26 p.m. EDT (1826 GMT), after hitting a record high for a fourth straight session at $1,575.79. U.S. June gold futures settled up 70 cents at $1,557.10 after ranging from $1,540.30 to $1,577.40.

Read more »


>

It is hard to be anything but bullish on copper prices over the long term – GFMS

China stocked, and then de-stocked, copper last year and while there remain downside risks to the price of the metal in the near term, GFMS says, given the fundamentals the long term remains bullish

Author: Rhona O’Connell
Posted:  Thursday , 07 Apr 2011


LONDON – 
There is a possibility of the emergence of negative news for copper consumption in the near future (linked to European sovereign debt, yet more trouble in the Middle east, further tightening of Chinese monetary policy or a series of lower than expected economic indicators for key mature markets), which could produce a significant correction in the price (currently at $9,500/t).  This, though, would generate a floor for prices, which should remain comfortably above $8,000/t.  Copper prices should subsequently resume an upward path, reaching new all-time highs approaching $11,000/t.
This is one of the key conclusions from the recently-published GFMS “Copper Survey 2011”.  The research house is expecting copper production to accelerate this year in line with higher prices, but does not believe that it will be able to keep pace with demand, thus keeping the market in deficit at least through to the end of 2011.  The Survey records a residual market deficit of just over 300,000 tonnes in 2010 (just less than one week’s refined consumption).  This comprised a gross deficit of 206,000 tonnes, a fall in reported stocks of 60,000 tonnes and an increase in “unreported” stocks of 176,000 tonnes.
The increase in these unreported stocks was concentrated primarily in China and South Korea and follows a 750,000 tonne increase in unreported stocks in 2009.  GFMS notes that the majority of the stock increase in China took place in the first months of last year, when there were arbitrage opportunities between local and international prices.  GFMS information suggests that there was destocking later in the year, especially in the last quarter; some of this was the mobilisation of physical investor positions, while much of the balance came from fabricators using inventory.  Some mobilisation is likely to have come about as a result of tightening credit and the need to generate cash.  Physical premia thus fell in China towards the end of the year, although the tightness in the market elsewhere in the world meant that international copper prices continued to rise, while local Chinese prices moved to a discount to the LME.
Global consumption increased by 11% or just under 2M tonnes over 2009 to 19.4M tonnes.  Almost 600,000 tonnes of this growth came from the mature economies, while the BRIC nations contributed a gain of 1.1M tonnes, much of which, of course, was in China.  The year 2009 was one of depressed demand in the mature economies, however and demand in these nations in 2010 did not regain the levels of any of the years 2006-2008 falling short of 2008 demand by more than 700,000 tonnes.  The rapid growth in demand in the BRIC nations, and the fact that 2009 demand in the Asian Tigers was barely below that of 2008, meant that the global fall in demand in 2009 was relatively shallow; global demand in 2010 was 4.2M tonnes higher than in 2000, an annual average growth rate of 2.5%.
Total reported inventories of copper stood at end-2010 at 1.28M tonnes, a fall of 160,000 tonnes or 11% from 2009, but substantially higher than the average level over 2004-2008.  The bulk of these stocks, which equated to just less than 3-1/2 weeks’ global refined demand, were in the hands of producers and the Exchanges.
The Survey, which goes into immense detail of the copper industry all across the supply and demand chains, identifies electrical and electronic products as the largest consumer of copper, with 38% market share last year, ahead of a 31% share for building construction.  Transport, and Consumer & General Products took up 11% each, with the balance in Industrial Machinery & Equipment.  The Survey comments that the general improvement in demand was encouraging given the economic uncertainties that continued to cloud the market.  Among mature economies as a whole, the construction sector was the only area that failed to register a double-digit rebound last year; these improvements in the other sectors reflected continued government stimuli in some areas, the release of pent-up demand and strengthening export demand, although overall offtake in these sectors in the mature economies remained below historical peak levels.
The continued improvements in the BRIC nations meant that their market share increased to more than 45% of total last year, compared with only 16% in 1990.  GFMS expects this trend to continue in the years to come, reflecting the continued shift of copper-product manufacturing towards China and other developing economies.  China accounted for 37% of global copper demand in 2010, reflecting the nation’s rapid economic growth, much of which revolved around copper-intensive end-uses.  Copper consumption in the mature economies, by contrast, has been falling at an annual rate of more than 3% over the past decade, reflecting the fact that infrastructure and urbanisation processes are now largely complete in these economies, along with the shift in the manufacturing sector towards low-cost areas.  This has been exacerbated by miniaturisation and technological advances that have impeded copper consumption in the mature economies.  Copper’s intensity of use, for example (expressed as tonnes of copper consumption per million dollars of GDP), has grown from 0.41 in 1990 in China to 0.79 last year; while in Brazil it has also doubled from 0.12 to 0.23.  In the United States it more than halved from 0.27 to 0.13.
GFMS takes a generally positive short and medium-term view for the metal’s fundamentals, with the rebound in demand expected to continue for much of the year.  Primary producers are responding to higher prices; secondary production was up by 19% last year and continues to increase this year.  GFMS believes though that much of the improvement in the market’s fundamentals have been discounted by prior investor activity and this, along with a speculative overhang, does mean that there are near-term downside risks to the price.  For the longer term, however, “it is hard to be anything but bullish for copper prices”.

GFMS bullish on copper – MINEWEB

The MasterMetals Blog


>

The annual payout will rise at a rate of 20 cents per share for each $100 per ounce increase in the average realized gold price.
Newmont plans to link dividend to gold prices

(Reuters) – Newmont Mining Corp (NEM.N), the world’s second-largest gold producer, plans to link its quarterly dividend to the price of gold it realizes for the preceding quarter.
The annual payout will rise at a rate of 20 cents per share for each $100 per ounce increase in the average realized gold price. The current gold price of about $1,450 an ounce will mean Newmont’s annual dividend would be $1.00.
“With our strong balance sheet and cash flow, we are positioned to fund profitable growth and to pay a new gold price-linked dividend,” Chief Executive Richard O’Brien said in a regulatory filing before its investor day.
The first quarterly dividend under this policy is expected to be payable on June 29. The company paid a quarterly dividend of 15 cents per share on March 30.
Newmont continues to see 2011 attributable gold production of 5.1-5.3 million ounces.
Newmont shares closed at $56.45 on Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange.
(Reporting by Krishna N Das in Bangalore; Editing by Maju Samuel)

Newmont plans to link dividend to gold prices | Reuters


In Peru back in 2008, junior miners – those companies who rely largely on capital markets for finance – proved to be the canaries down their own mines who warned of the credit crunch.
Juniors had flooded into the market to join a frenzy of exploration, attracted by a heady mix of soaring commodity prices, cheap credit, China-like rates of economic growth and Alan Garcia’s pro-investment policies. But, true to hot money form, they had already begun a rapid exit by the time Lehman Brothers fell and the commodities boom ended.
Now juniors are coming back, in a more orderly fashion.
They have been attracted, in part, by Peru’s economic recovery: GDP growth has hit double figures in recent months, and is forecast to be as high as 8 per cent for 2010 as a whole.
Credit is also attainable once more. Gonzalo de Rosa, junior-mining analyst at Banco de Credito, told beyondbrics:

As the crisis passes, [juniors] have been more actively getting more credit facilities; they can do private placements. I don’t think that’s going to be an issue for them in the next few years.
As prices begin to present a positive trend they’re going to be gain more appreciation in the market.

Some juniors have a headstart now, with social and environmental impact assessments approved before the downturn. Yet the increase in junior investment is not as steep as it was two years ago.
Alonso Segura, chief economist at Banco de Credito, points out the juniors’ challenge:

One thing is betting on the sovereigns of an investment grade country which is a star performer in the region, a medium-sized economy, or buying bonds of a very well rated company – a very different issue is buying bonds of a junior company, which is basically going to a casino.

Casinos or not, junior miners are certainly back in vogue

Peru: junior miners are back | beyondbrics | FT.com

Share this|var addthis_config = { ui_cobrand: “The MasterBlog”}

________________________
The MasterBlog


DRC: Independent Audit Of First Quantum Mining Firm To Be Launched

The Democratic Republic of Congo plans to audit the operations of First Quantum Minerals Ltd. in the country to examine “suspected wide-scale misconduct,” Bloomberg reported Aug. 31, citing Mines Minister Martin Kabwelulu. A body engaged in financial auditing will carry out the investigation, which will look into allegations that First Quantum illegally exported copper ore without fully declaring it.

Share|avar addthis_config = { ui_cobrand: “The MasterLivingBlog”}


Rogers Says World Needs Higher Interest Rates, Commodities Set to Advance

China and other global economies should increase interest rates to contain a surge in inflation, said investor Jim Rogers, chairman of Rogers Holdings.
“Everyone should be raising interest rates, they are too low worldwide,” Rogers said in a phone interview from Singapore. “If the world economy gets better, that’s good for commodities demand. If the world economy does not get better, stocks are going to lose a lot as governments will print more money.”
China’s central bank hasn’t increased rates since November 2007. In the U.S., the Federal Reserve this month left the overnight interbank lending rate target in a range of zero to 0.25 percent, where it’s been since December 2008, while the European Central Bank has kept its key interest rate at a record low of 1 percent.
Policy makers in Malaysia, South Korea, Taiwan and Thailand have increased the cost of borrowing at least once this year, while India has boosted rates four times in five months.
The global economy is at the risk of prolonging a recession after reports over the past two days showed U.S. home sales plunged by a record and Japan’s export growth slowed for a fifth month in July, he said.
“We never got out of the first recession,” Rogers said. “If the U.S. and Europe continue to slow down, that’s going to affect everyone. The Chinese economy is 1/10 of the U.S. and Europe and India is a quarter of China, they can’t bail us out.”
Rogers, who predicted the start of the global commodities rally in 1999, said he was short emerging markets and stocks and long on commodities.
“Commodities will go above their old high sometime in the next decade even if they only grow 5 to 6 percent annually,” said Rogers, who is a consultant for the Dalian Commodity Exchange.
Rogers said he would resume buying China’s stocks if they were to tumble as they did during the aftermath of the global financial crisis in 2008, when they plunged 65 percent. “I haven’t bought since the fall of 2008,” he said. “It it were to happen again, I hope that I’m smart enough to buy again.”
Allen Wan. With assistance from Chua Kong Ho. Editors: Richard Frost, Linus Chua
To contact the Bloomberg News staff on this story: Allen Wan in Shanghai at awan3@bloomberg.net

Rogers Says World Needs Higher Interest Rates, Commodities Set to Advance – Bloomberg

Share this|var addthis_config = { ui_cobrand: “The MasterBlog”}

________________________
The MasterBlog




Rusoro foresees Venezuela gold export rule change

Thu Aug 5, 2010 10:36pm GMT

* Russian-Canadian company says gov’t has agreed to change
* Firms would be able to export 50 percent of gold output
CARACAS Aug 5 (Reuters) – Russian-Canadian miner Rusoro (RML.V) said on Thursday it expects the Venezuelan government to ease a restriction on gold exports to allow private firms to sell up to 50 percent of output abroad.
Current rules allow only 30 percent exports, with the rest to be sold in-country, mainly to the Central Bank.
“A fair agreement has been reached between the government and the mining industry to allow 50 percent of output to be sold to the Central Bank and the other 50 percent exported,” said Rusoro’s local operations director Andrea Padovani.
Central Bank officials could not confirm.
Rusoro’s Padovani said, however, the new norm should be published in coming days in the government’s Official Gazette.
“After a meeting with the Central Bank president, Nelson Merentes, we were told that the norm had been approved by the directors and all that was needed was President Hugo Chavez’s signature,” Padovani told Reuters.
Rusoro had warned earlier this year that it may cut a $200 million investment plan in Venezuela unless the export regulations were changed.
Rusoro’s main interest is the Choco 10 gold mine in the southern state of Bolivar.
Rusoro’s production from Choco in the first quarter was 25,142 ounces, 34 percent less than the same period last year. The company blames Venezuela’s currency distortions for that, saying it has been hard to import machinery and materials.
It expects to produce nearly 100,000 ounces this year, down from 125,741 last year. But Rusoro foresees higher production of 184,725 ounces in 2011.
(Reporting by Diego Ore, Writing by Andrew Cawthorne; Editing by Sofina Mirza-Reid)
© Thomson Reuters 2010. All rights reserved. Users may download and print extracts of content from this website for their own personal and non-commercial use only. Republication or redistribution of Thomson Reuters content, including by framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Thomson Reuters. Thomson Reuters and its logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of the Thomson Reuters group of companies around the world.

Thomson Reuters journalists are subject to an Editorial Handbook which requires fair presentation and disclosure of relevant interests.





%d bloggers like this: