Posts Tagged ‘Debt’


>below are some excerpts from Jim Rogers interview:

Dollar will be debased; gold and silver to hit new highs

Chinese economy:

There is some overheating and inflation

setback in urban, coastal real estate is under way

China has been overbuilding ever since I have been visiting. There is at least eventual demand for much of it, but that does not preclude some bankruptcies in the future.

Europe:

I think we are getting closer and closer to the point where someone in Europe is going to have to take some losses, whether it's the banks or the countries, but somebody has to acknowledge that they are bankrupt.

Following is an interview that The Daily Bell had with Jim Rogers:

Jim Rogers: Dollar will be debased; gold and silver to hit new highs
05 April 2011 | http://www.commodityonline.com

Daily Bell: We've interviewed you before. Thanks for spending some time with us once again. Let's jump right in. What do you think of the Chinese economy these days?

Jim Rogers: There is some overheating and inflation, which they are wisely trying to cool – especially in urban, coastal real estate. They have huge reserves so will suffer less than others in any coming downturn.

Daily Bell: Is price inflation more or less of a problem?

Jim Rogers: More. At least they acknowledge inflation and are attacking it. Some countries still try denying there is inflation worldwide. The US is even pouring gasoline on these inflationary trends with more money printing instead of trying to extinguish the problem.

Daily Bell: Is China headed for a setback as you suggested last time we spoke?

Jim Rogers: Did I say a setback or a setback in real estate speculation? I think you will find it was the latter. Yes, the setback in urban, coastal real estate is under way.

Daily Bell: They are allowing the yuan to float upward. Good move?

Jim Rogers: Yes, but I would make it freely convertible faster than they are.

Daily Bell: Will that squeeze price inflation?

Jim Rogers: It will help.

Daily Bell: Why so many empty cities and malls in China? Does the government have plans to move rural folk into cities en masse?

Jim Rogers: That is a bit exaggerated. China has been overbuilding ever since I have been visiting. There is at least eventual demand for much of it, but that does not preclude some bankruptcies in the future.

Daily Bell: Is such centralized planning good for the economy?

Jim Rogers: No. Centralized planning is rarely, if ever, good for the economy. But the kind of construction you are describing is at the provincial level – not the national level.

Daily Bell: The Chinese government is worried about unrest given what is occurring in the Middle East. Should they be?

Jim Rogers: We all should be. There is going to be more social unrest worldwide including the US. More governments will fall. More countries will fail.

Daily Bell: Are they still on track to be the world's biggest economy over the next decade?

Jim Rogers: Perhaps not that soon, but eventually.

Daily Bell: Any thoughts on Japan? Why haven't they been able to get the economy moving after 30 years? Will the earthquake finally jump-start the economy or is that an erroneous application of the broken-windows fallacy?

Jim Rogers: It has been 20 years. They refused to let people fail and go bankrupt. They constantly propped up zombie companies. The earthquake will help some sectors for a while, but there are serious demographic and debt problems down the road.

Daily Bell: The Japanese were going to buy PIGS bonds. What will happen now? Does that only leave China?

Jim Rogers: Obviously the Japanese have other things on their mind right now. I think we are getting closer and closer to the point where someone in Europe is going to have to take some losses, whether it's the banks or the countries, but somebody has to acknowledge that they are bankrupt. The thing that the world needs is for somebody to acknowledge reality and start taking haircuts.

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By Albert Edwards, Société Générale, London 

The current situation reminds me of mid 2007. Investors then were content to stick their heads into very deep sand and ignore the fact that The Great Unwind had clearly begun. But in August and September 2007, even though the wheels were clearly falling off the global economy, the S&P still managed to rally 15%! The recent reaction to data suggests the market is in a similar deluded state of mind. Yet again, equity investors refuse to accept they are now locked in a Vulcan death grip and are about to fall unconscious.

The notion that the equity market predicts anything has always struck me as ludicrous. In the 25 years I have been following the markets it seems clear to me that the equity market reacts to events rather than pre-empting them. We know from the Japanese Ice Age and indeed from the US 1930’s experience, that in a post-bubble world the equity market merely follows the economic cycle. So to steal a march on the market, one should follow the leading indicators closely. These are variously pointing either to a hard landing or, at best, a decisive slowdown. In my view we are poised to slide back into another global recession: the data is slowing sharply but, just like Japan in its Ice Age, most still touchingly believe we are soft-landing. But before driving off a cliff to a hard (crash?) landing we might feel reassured when we pass a sign that reads Soft Landing and we can kid ourselves all is well

Read the rest of the story here  >  > >

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this is the CNBC video of Erin Burnett’s spat with Michael Pento of Euro Pacific Capital on the merits of US Treasuries.

Looks like someone doesn’t like it when you poke a hole in their fantasy world…

The best part of the video, however, is not that.

It is when the other guest, Joseph Balestrino of Federated Investors, says:

Nothing is in a bubble when people want to buy it..”!!!  

Go tell that to the guys that were buying the NASDAQ/loading up on tech stocks  in January 2000 or (and, as they were probably the same old fools) buying/flipping homes in California, Florida, etc during 2007!!

Airtime: Tues. Sept. 7 2010 | :40:0 10 ET

http://plus.cnbc.com/rssvideosearch/action/player/id/1585891838/code/cnbcplayershare

Is U.S. Debt Junk? – CNBC.com

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Exprinter Sells $626 Million of Notes Linked to Venezuela Debt
Bloomberg
September 03, 2010, 10:09 AM EDT
Sept. 3 (Bloomberg) — Exprinter International Bank NV in the Netherlands Antilles sold $626 million of structured notes linked to Venezuelan bonds, perceived by investors as the riskiest debt in the world.
The notes, issued in six parts, are tied to the performance of Venezuela government debt including bonds of state-owned oil company Petroleos de Venezuela, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The biggest portion is a $271 million issue of 20- year notes issued at 66.5 percent of face value yielding 14.5 percent. That compares with 15.2 percent on the underlying government bonds.
Credit-linked notes pay interest based on the price of the entities they reference and are usually bought by investors who aren’t able to trade the underlying securities because of regulations, cost or other reasons. Exprinter, based on the Caribbean island of Curacao, issued nine structured notes linked to Venezuela this year, Bloomberg data show.
Robin Powers, a U.S.-based lawyer at Rimon Law representing Exprinter, said the bank declined to comment on the deals.
The cost of insuring Venezuelan debt for 10 years with credit-default swaps jumped 17 percent this year to 1,120 basis points, the highest in the world ahead of Greece and Argentina. The contracts indicate a 78.4 percent probability of default on 10-year Venezuelan debt, according to data provider CMA.
Credit-default swaps are used to bet on or hedge against a borrower’s ability to repay debt. An increase indicates deterioration in the perception of credit quality. A basis point on a contract protecting $10 million of debt is equivalent to $1,000 a year.
Venezuela is rated BB- by Standard & Poor’s, three levels below investment grade, and two steps lower at B2 by Moody’s Investors Service.
The country’s economy shrank for a fifth quarter in the three months to June 30, making it the only Latin American country still in recession. Gross domestic product shrank 1.9 percent in the second quarter, and 3.5 percent in the first half.
–Editors: Andrew Reierson, Paul Armstrong
To contact the reporter on this story: Sarfraz Thind in London at Sthind3@bloomberg.net
To contact the editor responsible for this story: Paul Armstrong at Parmstrong10@bloomberg.net

Exprinter Sells $626 Million of Notes Linked to Venezuela Debt – BusinessWeek

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Gold: The Enemy of Currencies
Last week saw gold prices rise despite deflationary fears.
Taking a look at the chart below we can see the gold price in US dollars has traded in a narrow range since May. This is despite the dollar declining for much of that time, see chart further below. (Click to enlarge)

 

 We noted last week that we were going to keep an eye on the Fed Open Market Committee meeting in case they decided to increase the money supply even further. But they didn’t.

The Federal Open Market Committee failed to commit to anything… they didn’t say they would resort to more quantitative easing… they didn’t say they wouldn’t. Instead they’re pausing for breath.

The inflation, deflation debate continues 
As the deflationary, inflationary debate continues to be waged between financial heavyweights we stand on the side and watch. We’ve always believed the act of quantitative easing is inflationary; It inflates the money supply. We also think the governments only way out, of this huge debt burden it has imposed upon itself, is to inflate the debt. If you make the value of your debt less you have less to pay back, but it’s a juggling act. Inflate too much and you run the risk of hyperinflation, something that, the Germans will tell you, doesn’t bode well for an economy.

US Trade Deficit
What’s the next move for gold? We have to wait and see what happens around the globe to find that out. Certainly, its course is no longer dictated by the movement of the dollar as much as it once was. Will this relationship resurface? Probably, but when it does it will most likely be when the dollar makes a significant move, triggering panic in the dollar or gold.

Which is more likely – a panic or strength in the dollar?
Last week Bloomberg reported that the US trade deficit has swelled to an incredible figure:
“The U.S. trade deficit widened by $7.9 billion in June, the most since record-keeping began in 1992, to $49.9 billion, a report from the Commerce Department showed. Exports posted the biggest decline since April 2009.

“Investors should prepare for “major structural changes” as the global economy shifts to slower growth, Mohamed A. El- Erian, chief executive officer at Pacific Investment Management Co. said yesterday in a radio interview on “Bloomberg Surveillance” with Tom Keene.”

This news reverberated around the markets.

A quick look at the VIX index shows us that fear has reentered the market… again. At the far right of the graph you can see the index rises sharply which signifies a growing fear of volatility in the markets.

With a stuttering economy and growing tension between the US and China, the trade balance could play a huge role in a dollar devaluation. But in order for the dollar to drop further people will have to lose faith in its safe haven status. Which means an alternative currency will need to take its place. The problem with this scenario is that there aren’t too many other candidates for the role as a global reserve currency. And whilst that is the case gold can continue to take center stage.

Will things get better?
In the grand scheme of things the debt, from Dubai to Greece has just been shuffled around. The run up in the stock markets suggests stability but investors are cautious. They’re wondering if this is another ‘suckers rally’. And they’re right to be cautious. If you play with fire… well you know that old saying. In other words it doesn’t end well.

Can things get better? That depends on what governments do.

More money printing can only add to the attractiveness of gold. But gold is the enemy of currencies. As Alan Greenspan once noted, to control the dollar you have to control the gold price.

The fight for governments around the world is one which is traded in blows against the gold price. And should they win the price of gold may very well settle back to lower prices until supported by a strong level of jewelry demand. But this is dependent on currencies being kept under control. Both the US and the UK have not ruled out further money printing, and with each new wave of money the original currency is worth less and less.

It all sounds too reactionary to us. There doesn’t seem to be a grand plan. Maybe there cannot be as the markets lead themselves. But whatever the case, none of the actions by those in power have any finiteness about them. There’s no plan and no control.

Disclosure: No positions
http://seekingalpha.com/article/221174-gold-the-enemy-of-currencies?source=feed
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U.S. Lawmakers Gear Up to Seek New Yuan Policy

WASHINGTON—The U.S. trade deficit with China in June hit its highest level in nearly two years and could spur congressional pressure on Beijing to revamp its currency policy.

America’s trade deficit with China jumped 17% in June over the previous month to $26.2 billion, the biggest gap since October 2008. Earlier this week, China said its overall trade surplus hit $28.7 billion in July, an 18-month high.

Associated Press

A production line in Guangdong province, in southern China, in May.

The Commerce Department figures could set the stage for a fight in Congress this fall over China’s currency policy. Some lawmakers, arguing that China has set the yuan artificially low to make its exports more price competitive on global markets, are keen to pass laws that would penalize countries that are found to be manipulating their currencies.

China, under pressure from the U.S. and other countries, announced a shift to a more-flexible exchange rate in June. But the yuan has appreciated less than 1% since then, and some economists say that it remains undervalued against the dollar by at least 25%.

While efforts to pass such legislation have made little headway, lawmakers and industry groups agree that the issue could gain traction in September, given that voters, who head to the polls in November, are angry about the country’s continued weak economy and high unemployment rate.

A number of bills have garnered bipartisan support, including measures promoted by Tim Ryan (D., Ohio) and Patrick Murphy (D., Pa.) in the House, and by Charles Schumer (D., N.Y.) in the Senate.

These efforts would, among other things, make it easier for companies to seek import duties on goods from countries designated as having undervalued currencies. The Ryan-Murphy bill has more than 127 co-sponsors, including 37 Republicans.

Nadeam Elshami, a spokesman for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.), said the House Ways and Means Committee would hold a hearing on the currency issue in September after Congress returns from summer recess.

“But no final decisions have been made on moving legislation forward,” he said.

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D., Ohio), a co-sponsor of the Schumer bill and a member of President Barack Obama’s Export Council, wrote Mr. Obama on Aug. 4, urging the administration to take tougher measures to address “unfairly subsidized exports” by countries such as China. Ten other senators signed the letter, including Republicans Jim Bunning of Kentucky and Olympia Snowe of Maine.

The Treasury Department on Wednesday declined to comment on the U.S.-China trade gap or China’s currency policy.

Business groups are expected to intensify their lobbying on the issue, although they differ over whether punitive legislation aimed at China’s currency policy is the best solution for narrowing the U.S.-China trade gap.

Augustine Tantillo, executive director of the American Manufacturing Trade Action Coalition, a Washington trade group representing U.S. manufacturers, says the group backs the Ryan-Murphy bill and is lobbying lawmakers, targeting those from Midwestern and Southeastern states with large manufacturing sectors and high unemployment.

“These trade surpluses aren’t a result of happenstance,” he said. “We’re hoping concerns about job creation and the fall election environment will finally give us an opportunity to bring the legislation to a vote.”

Erin Ennis, vice president for the U.S.-China Business Council, which represents U.S. companies doing business in China, said the window for China to “show it was serious” about addressing U.S. concerns about the yuan would close in September, when Congress returns to session.

But while Ms. Ennis expected the Chinese currency policy to be a major issue in the fall, “this isn’t our member companies’ top priority,” she said.

Rather, she said that Congress and the administration should focus on reducing barriers to China’s market and on the country’s new “indigenous innovation” policy, which many Western companies say unfairly favors Chinese companies by promoting domestic innovation.
Write to Kathy Chen at kathy.chen@wsj.com

U.S.-China Trade Gap Stirs Lawmakers – WSJ.com

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