Posts Tagged ‘Phone’


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Stolen Camera Finder Finds Stolen Cameras

Drag a photo onto the box and it will search for other pictures with your camera’s serial number
If you lose your phone or your computer, there’s a fair chance you’ll get it back if you’re using some kind of tracking software. As we have seen before, Apple’s Find my iPhone service has rescued more than one lost phone. But what about your other gadgets?
If your camera is stolen, you now have at least a chance of finding it thanks to the Stolen Camera Finder by Matt Burns. It works by searching the web for photos bearing the serial number of your camera. This number is embedded in the EXIF data of every photograph you take.
Using the tool is easy. Just visit the site and drag a photo from your camera onto the waiting box. The tool searches its database for your camera and if it finds it, you can then go see the pictures. This may — hopefully — give you some clues as to where it is now. You’ll need to use a JPG image (RAW doesn’t work) and some cameras don’t write their serial number into the metadata.
The data comes from Flickr, and also from data crawled from the web. Matt has also written a browser extension for Google Chrome which will check the serial number of photos on every page you visit and add it to the database.
I tried the tool with a photo from my camera, and nothing showed up. I have a ton of photos online, on both on Flickr and here at Wired.com, so I was expecting something. I guess that the service will increase in value as time passes and the database grows. Still, the service is free, and if nothing else it lets you view a whole lot of information about your photos in the drop-down list.
Stolen Camera Finder [Stolen Camera Finder via Photography Bay]
See Also:

Stolen Camera Finder Finds Stolen Cameras | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

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HTC, founded only in 1997 and for the first 11 years of its existence was a little-known contract manufacturer for other brands, was valued at $33.8bn after the close of trading in Asia on Thursday,
HTC’s market value is also bigger company than either Sony or LG Electronics, according to Thomson Reuters data, but it remains smaller than Apple or Samsung Electronics, although unlike those two companies, the smartphone is the Taiwanese company’s sole business.
HTC shares are now a third higher than they were at the start of the year, while Nokia’s shares have fallen by a fifth over the same period

HTC overtakes Nokia in market value

FT.com / Telecoms – By Robin Kwong in Taipei
Published: April 7 2011 12:54 | Last updated: April 7 2011 12:54

Taiwan’s HTC has overtaken Nokia to become the third most valuable maker of mobile phones, highlighting the speed with which touchscreen-based smartphones have become a mass-market product in Europe and the US.
The growth of HTC, which was valued at $33.8bn after the close of trading in Asia on Thursday, also highlights the slide in value of Nokia which has failed to innovate in the new smartphone market.
The problems facing the Finnish mobile phone maker, which had a market capitalisation of $33.4bn based on Wednesday’s closing prices, were highlighted by Moody’s on Thursday.
The credit agency downgraded Nokia’s debt rating from A2 to A3, citing the company’s weakened market position and uncertainty over its transition to Microsoft’s Windows Phone software.
HTC’s market value is also bigger company than either Sony or LG Electronics, according to Thomson Reuters data, but it remains smaller than Apple or Samsung Electronics, although unlike those two companies, the smartphone is the Taiwanese company’s sole business.
HTC shares are now a third higher than they were at the start of the year, while Nokia’s shares have fallen by a fifth over the same period.
Nokia remains the world’s biggest producer of mobile devices by volume, with a 28.9 per cent global market share at the end of last year, according to Gartner.
But Nokia has fallen behind rivals in the smartphone market where Apple’s iPhone and Android-based phonemakers such as HTC have taken market share.
Nokia’s failure to compete culminated in a high-profile management reshuffle last year, with Steven Elop becoming the first non-Finnish chief executive of the company in its 145-year history.
Mr Elop, who joined Nokia from Microsoft, likened the company’s predicament to a man on a “burning platform” as he outlined a plan to transform the company and make it more competitive.
The American is now seeking to reinvent Nokia as a provider of premium smartphones based on Microsoft’s Windows Mobile platform.
HTC’s rapid rise reflects the speed with which touchscreen-based smartphones have become a mass-market product in Europe and the US.
Its sales last year was T$278.8bn ($9.6bn) and it shipped 24.7m units last year, according to Gartner, compared with 46.6m units of iPhones shipped last year.
While growth is expected to slow this year compared with 2010, the global smartphone market is still expected to grow by 50 per cent, according to IDC.
Unlike HTC, which was positioned from the start to take advantage of this trend, many other mobile phonemakers were caught off-guard by this rapid change.
HTC was founded only in 1997 and for the first 11 years of its existence was a little-known contract manufacturer for other brands. But since it made the world’s first Android-based phone for T-Mobile in 2008, the company has proved quick to adapt to the market’s changes.
HTC took advantage of the 18-month period in which it was the sole producer of Android-based phones to grow quickly in size. C.K. Cheng, analyst at CLSA, the equity brokerage, says that HTC’s scale means that “in times of tightness in the supply chain, such as now after the Japan earthquake, all the suppliers are going to ensure that Apple and HTC get their orders filled first rather than Motorola or Sony Ericsson”.
The rally in HTC’s shares also reflects the fact that it has been quick to fill the nascent market for phones running on much faster, fourth-generation networks. In the US, HTC’s Evo Shift, for Sprint’s network, and its Thunderbolt, for Verizon, are the only two 4G smartphones available on the market, although competing devices will soon be launched.
“Even if it is just a one or two-month lead, it is still a significant advantage,” Mr Cheng said.
However, some analysts, such as Morgan Stanley’s Jasmine Lu, worry that HTC will face increasing headwinds as competitors catch up, and may see its profit margins fall if low or mid-ranged smartphone models grow in popularity at the expense of premium models.

Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2011
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Vivendi to Buy Vodafone SFR Stake for $11.3 Billion

Vivendi, the French media conglomerate, announced on Sunday
that it had taken full control of SFR, a large cellphone
service provider, buying Vodafone’s 44 percent stake in
the company for $11.3 billion in cash.

The deal gives Vivendi full control of one of its biggest
business units, a longtime goal for the company. SFR is one
of the biggest cellphone carriers in France. It earned
nearly 4 billion euros in profit last year and had about 20
million mobile service customers as of Sept. 1.

DEALBOOK:
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/04/03/vivendi-to-buy-vodafones-stake-in-sfr-for-11-billion/?nl=business&emc=dlbka9


>More Clues Point to iPhone Nano Debut [REPORT]
More Clues Point to iPhone Nano Debut [REPORT

Is there a smaller, cheaper version of the iPhone on the way? Rumors abound, but now the Wall Street Journal has found “people familiar with the matter” who have actually laid hands and eyes upon it:

“One of the people, who saw a prototype of a new iPhone several months ago, said the new device is intended to be sold alongside the current line of iPhones and would be about half the size of the iPhone 4. The phone, one of its codenames is N97, would be available to mobile carriers at about half the price of Apple’s main line of iPhones, the person said.”

According to the Wall Street Journal, Apple’s also considering making its MobileMe online storage service free, allowing users to store their data in the cloud rather than on a small device such as an iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad. This move could facilitate a smaller iPhone, which could store most of its data elsewhere rather than within its tiny confines.

When will we see such a tiny iPhone, reportedly one-third smaller than its bigger brother, and costing $200 with no contract? The WSJ sources are saying this summer, which is right in line with the usual time new iPhones are unveiled.

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>NEW YORK (AP) — A research firm says Google Inc.’s Android has become the world’s No. 1 smart phone software, surpassing Nokia Corp.’s Symbian operating system based on shipments in the fourth quarter of 2010.
Canalys said Monday that shipments of Android-based smart phones hit 32.9 million in the last three months of the year, while devices running the Symbian platform fell slightly behind at 31 million worldwide. Apple Inc. was in third place with 16.2 million units.
The overall smart phone market soared 89 percent in the fourth quarter, to 101.2 million units shipped, Canalys said.
“After a difficult 2009, the speed with which the market has recovered has required real commitment and innovation from vendors and they have risen to the challenge,” said Canalys vice president and principal analyst Chris Jones in a statement.
Google first rolled out its free Android mobile software in 2008 on HTC Corp.’s G1 smart phone. It has since expanded to more than 170 phones and a number of tablet computers. The company said last week it is getting closer to releasing a version of the Android software meant for tablet computers, one that will include a fresh look and updated Web browser and keyboard.
Google’s shares slipped 68 cents to $600.31 in morning trading, while American Depositary shares of Espoo, Finland-based Nokia climbed 10 cents to $10.66. Shares of Apple climbed $1.31 to $337.54.
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/110131/us_google_android.html?.v=1

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>Gadgetwise - The New York Times Blog

AUGUST 30, 2010, 5:46 PM

Does Google’s Free Phone Service Work in Other Countries?

Google’s Call Phones from Gmail lets Gmail users turn their computers into telephones by talking into a built-in microphone or by attaching a headset. The service, Google said when it announced Call Phones last week, is restricted to callers in the United States. Calls within the United States and to Canada are free, and most international calls are around 2 cents a minute. If you also sign up for Google’s free Google Voice service, available only within the United States, you can also receive calls free through Google’s servers.
What if you’re not a lucky resident of the United States? Over the weekend, word spread on the Internet that at least some people outside the United States had made free calls to the United States and Canada from Gmail. According to several excited updates on Twitter, Gmail lets at least some users outside the country make calls as if they are dialing from inside the country. All they need do is make sure their Gmail account settings specify English (U.S.) rather than English (U.K.).
They can’t use Google Voice to take calls, but they can make them free, or cheaply. (To change the settings, log in to Gmail and click Settings in the upper right corner of the Gmail interface. Language is the first option at the top. Google will also prompt you to install a small voice and video chat browser add-on before you can make calls.)
A Google spokesman, Randall Sarafa, explained that for users outside the United States, or for Americans traveling abroad, Google’s free services might work, but they had not been officially introduced to other countries. To quote Google, “We launched the Call Phones from Gmail feature to U.S. users as our first step and will be rolling out additional localized versions in the future. Depending on local laws and regulations, if your account is set to U.S.-English, you might be able to access the feature in some other countries as well.”
Does it work for you, or did you get an error message? Let us know in the comments below.

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RIM = RIP ?

Sounds like TAPS in the background….

Between the pressure on the corporate side of the business from governments who want access to all the data passing through the blackberries in their countries, and the real risk of migration by consumers to the iPhone and Android OS, the future doesn’t look too bright RIM…

see the article below from zerohedge.com


As Research in Motion Continues Its Inevitable Downward Descent In Both Equity Value and Market Share, Investors Should Tweak Their Assumptions Accordingly



Following up on my Research in Motion commentary in , I’d like to comment on potential future paths for the company. From what I see from their public announcements, I remain as unimpressed now as I was just before (After Getting a Glimpse of the New Windows Phone 7 Functionality, RIMM is Looking More Like a Short Play) and after (RIM Smart Phone Market Share, RIP?) the OS6/Torch launch. The tricky part is that RIMM is now starting to look rather inexpensive relative to consensus earnings and historically projected growth rates. This is where a little strategic foresight comes into play. I have made available for download (for all paying subscribers) the Mobile Operating System Market Share Model which illustrates, on a very granular level, the market share movements (gains and losses) of the major mobile OS providers.
Research in Motions recent equity share decline stems not only from market share loss, but from the apparent lack of a clear cut and believable plan to stem that market share loss.
Thus the downloadable OS model design is to congeal data garnered from Gartner, Bloomberg, Neilsen, Canalys and other sources in order to realistically track movement in the mobile OS space. Since this model actually deserves a post of its own, I will simply pull out some pertinent charts that pertain to RIMM.
Research in Motion, is still currently the market leader in terms of share, but is losing both demonstrably and rapidly in new users. As a matter of fact, if the recent historical trends persist, this is the last quarter that RIM will be able to claim the top of the market title as Android looks well situated to claim that crown.
As can be seen from this chart, Android is just about there. Apple will probably show better numbers in Q3 with additional evidence of iPhone 4 adoption as well.
We, at BoomBustBlog actually believe that RIM is poised to lose market share (particularly the consumer market where it enterprise stickiness can’t come into play) quite quickly and radically due to dissatisfaction among its user base combined with technically far superior handsets in the iPhone and Android camps.
So, although RIM is looking quite cheap now, it is quite possible for it to look much cheaper. The question is how does this market share loss factor into its equity valuation. That is why I have supplied our Professional and Institutional subscribers with the plug and play File Icon RIMM Multivariate Valuation Model. By plugging
Additional writings on Research in Motion:


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